superseventies:

Francis Ford Coppola and Robert De Niro on the set of ‘The Godfather: Part II’, 1974.

superseventies:

Francis Ford Coppola and Robert De Niro on the set of ‘The Godfather: Part II’, 1974.

(Source: otfilms)

Forthcoming rock candy…

Forthcoming rock candy…

eluniversodelasenora:

Via Lost Gallery

eluniversodelasenora:

Via Lost Gallery

Singing Wind Bookstore, Benson, Arizona

‘Winifred Bundy has been selling books here for 40 years. It’s a little tricky to find, situated on a working cattle farm four miles from the nearest town. It doesn’t have a website, Twitter, Facebook or email address. “It doesn’t even have opening hours: you just have to turn up and hope for the best.”’

Photograph: Greg Alford via The Guardian

Singing Wind Bookstore, Benson, Arizona

‘Winifred Bundy has been selling books here for 40 years. It’s a little tricky to find, situated on a working cattle farm four miles from the nearest town. It doesn’t have a website, Twitter, Facebook or email address. “It doesn’t even have opening hours: you just have to turn up and hope for the best.”’

Photograph: Greg Alford via The Guardian

just re-watched my ancient VHS copy of one of the lost movie masterpieces of the 1970’s, Wim Wender’s Im Lauf der Zeit (Kings of the Road), (1976).

It’s absolutely ridiculous that this film is currently out of print in the U.S. and unavailable on DVD or Blu-ray. It deserves the full Criterion treatment.

Lennon

Lennon

(Source: yourloveisasong9)

Right, what was I thinking. This is why I never read my comment threads… [T]he aggressive stupidity of these two comments exemplifies why I have a hard time getting misty-eyed about the inherent democracy of the online world. We know there are people with these prejudices reading us. We also know we’re making sense in clear and grammatical English, so fuck them. And if we’re rock critics, we may even suspect—I do—that without the aggressively stupid pressuring the art we love, it might well sink into a pretension we have no use for—the Arcade Fire are a dangerously earnest band, but they know enough to put on a joyous and sometimes silly show, without which they might be fatally earnest. And nevertheless, absorbing aggressive stupidity in all its pustulating detail is disheartening in a way that does nobody any good I can see.

- Robert Christgau, “The Perils of Criticism”

strummerville:


The Clash, Joe Strummer & Paul Simonon, Théâtre de Verdure Nice, 1981 #throwbackthurday #theclash #joestrummer #paulsimonon #punkrock by saraelisabeth02 http://ift.tt/1u15g73

strummerville:

The Clash, Joe Strummer & Paul Simonon, Théâtre de Verdure Nice, 1981 #throwbackthurday #theclash #joestrummer #paulsimonon #punkrock by saraelisabeth02 http://ift.tt/1u15g73

The NSA had grown so confident that no one would ever dare to write about it that it had let its guard down. I would occasionally drive up to the agency, park in the executive parking lot, walk in the front door to the lobby, get some coffee and have a seat. All around me were employees from the CIA and foreign intelligence agencies, all waiting to be processed for their NSA visitor’s badge. As I read my paper and sipped my coffee, I quietly listened to them chat away about signals intelligence operations, new listening posts, cooperative agreements, and a host of other topics. No one ever asked who I was or why I was there. In the parking lot, I copied the license plate numbers of the dozen cars parked closest to the front entrance, then ran the numbers at the registry of motor vehicles. The result was a Who’s Who of the NSA’s leadership, as well as the liaison officers from America’s so-called Five Eyes surveillance partners: England, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand.

- “The NSA and Me,” by James Bamford

(Source: firstlook.org)

lewistaylorillustration:

Happy World Animal Day!
Field mouse in watercolour & ink. 

lewistaylorillustration:

Happy World Animal Day!

Field mouse in watercolour & ink. 

The groundbreaking television phenomenon, Golden Globe® and Peabody Award-winner TWIN PEAKS will return as a new limited series on SHOWTIME in 2016. Series creators and executive producers David Lynch and Mark Frost will write and produce all nine episodes of the limited series, and Lynch will direct every episode. Set in the present day, TWIN PEAKS will continue the lore of the original series, providing long-awaited answers and a satisfying conclusion for the series’ passionate fan base.

Demon Coffee

Children that are allowed to partake freely of coffee will become restless, fussy and noisy, half wild with mischief. They probably advance in their school studies with abnormal rapidity. But they hate work. At times they are indifferent about education. Their strength goes to the brain. They grow rapidly, but not aright. They develop into men and women three years too soon. Yet their eyes dance with angelic splendor, and their cheeks glow with vermilion, providing that they started in life with robust constitutions. If they began life with puny physiques, however, coffee will make them slim and ghostly, and their eyes and features flat. Coffee will seem to improve those persons only who have a surplus of constitutional vigor. These individuals will seem possessed with forms and faces of marvelous grace and finish, yet they will fade all too soon, and fall into the hands of the doctor. Coffee has a magical effect on the heart and circulatory system, and for a while produces the intoxication, which approaches that of opium or cocaine. It causes a swift growth and swift decay. It produces beauty and exhilaration, but not endurance. It gives a sentimental strength—the strength that pertains to runts. The best thing that can be said of coffee is, that it has a tendency, like opium, to make lawless persons tame … Coffee eats into the digestive membranes, forcing their glands to pour forth their reserve of juices, thus drying up the fountains of life and leaving in these little urns of vitality the seeds of rheumatism, catarrh, kidney ailment, heart diseaseg, lung infirmity, and abdominal degeneration. Coffee-drinking exhausts the mouth and throat, leaving the face a grinning skeleton, while the body is honeycombed.

— J.M. Holaday, “Coffee-Drinking and Blindness,” The North American Review, September 1888 (via The Paris Review, h/t The Dish)

"This beaver family is so used to Bettina and Christian Kutschenreiter from Rosenheim near Munich, Germany, that they recognise their voices and let them take close-up shots. Perhaps understandable as the Kutschenreiter have been visiting them for 10 years since they first interrupted them taking pictures of kingfishers."

Photograph: Kutschenreiter/Solent News via The Guardian

"This beaver family is so used to Bettina and Christian Kutschenreiter from Rosenheim near Munich, Germany, that they recognise their voices and let them take close-up shots. Perhaps understandable as the Kutschenreiter have been visiting them for 10 years since they first interrupted them taking pictures of kingfishers."

Photograph: Kutschenreiter/Solent News via The Guardian

>The Intrinsic Value of Blogging | Matt Mullenweg

“The antidote I’ve found for this is to write for only two people. First, write for yourself, both your present self whose thinking will be clarified by distilling an idea through writing and editing, and your future self who will be able to look back on these words and be reminded of the context in which they were written.

Second, write for a single person who you have in mind as the perfect person to read what you write, almost like a letter, even if they never will, or a person who you’re sure will read it because of a connection you have to them (hi Mom!).”

>15 Lessons from 15 Years of Blogging - Anil Dash

“Your blog can change your life in a month. If you want to understand an idea, or become a meaningful voice on a topic, or change your own thinking about a concept, write a little bit about it every day for a month. The first posts might suck, but invariably the exercise and the discipline of doing the writing are transformative. Sometimes the rest of the world even notices it.”