Sometimes at night I think one can feel even the pressure of mice waiting in the walls of old houses. All that concentrated life around us and above us, held in check, surging impatiently, ready for a new experiment, tired of us, waiting our passing, active with the busy mysteries of the cell. Sometimes one catches oneself wondering what the fire-apes were intending when they crossed the barrier, whether they were cut short in a new experiment, something smaller, more delicate, more—something, but not a human something. Something for which human beings must first be gotten out of the way. It is perhaps significant that even we ourselves feel a growing inadequacy. Perhaps that is really the secret. Perhaps we are going away.

- Loren Eiseley, "The Fire-Apes" (1949)

Danny Rifkin’s business card — original co-manager of the Dead

Danny Rifkin’s business card — original co-manager of the Dead

(Source: powerlesspress)

best record ever? perhaps
ace1965:

Fairport Convention “Liege And Leaf” promo, Rolling Stone magazine, June 11. 1970.

best record ever? perhaps

ace1965:

Fairport Convention “Liege And Leaf” promo, Rolling Stone magazine, June 11. 1970.

(via Twitter / iman_jorgeno: Lou Reed and Laurie Anderson)

(via Twitter / iman_jorgeno: Lou Reed and Laurie Anderson)

"See you next year at the Halloween Parade…."

Lou Reed; the last photo shoot by Jean Baptiste Mondino.
Shot at Industria Superstudio, NYC. September 21, 2013.

Lou Reed; the last photo shoot by Jean Baptiste Mondino. Shot at Industria Superstudio, NYC. September 21, 2013.

It was Reed who defined the band’s sensibility, embodied its contradictions. He was a romantic alienated bohemian and an antiromantic pop ironist, a middle-class Jewish kid from Brooklyn who came on like a streetwise punk in tight jeans and shades, a classical piano student turned rock and roller, Bob Dylan-cum-Nelson Algren-cum-Jean Genet. He talked his songs in an expressive semi-mumble that made you think of James Dean without the naiveté.

Not that Lou did not display his own kind of innocence. His songs hinted, when you least expected it, that underneath the meanness and paranoia, the affectless brutality that smothered pain, there was after all the possibility of love.

-

Ellen Willis

RIP, Lou.

(via ellenwillis)

In reducing rock-and-roll to its harshest essentials, the new wave took Lou Reed’s aesthete-punk conceit to a place he never intended. For the Velvets the aesthete-punk stance was a way of surviving in a world that was out to kill you; the point was not to glorify the punk, or even to say fuck you to the world, but to be honest about the strategies people adopt in a desperate situation. The Velvets were not nihilists but moralists. In their universe nihilism regularly appears as a vivid but unholy temptation, love and its attendant vulnerability as scary and poignant imperatives. Though Lou Reed rejected optimism, he was enough of his time to crave transcendence. And finally—as “Rock & Roll” makes explicit—the Velvets’ use of a mass art form was a metaphor for transcendence, for connection, for resistance to solipsism and despair.

- These sentences, from Ellen Willis’ essay “The Velvet Underground,” are exactly how I want to remember Lou Reed. The piece originally appeared in Greil Marcus’ ‘Stranded’ collection, but is reprinted in ‘Out of the Vinyl Deeps,’ the anthology of Willis’ music criticism edited by Nona Willis Aronowitz. (via judyxberman)

atane:

Lou Reed’s high school yearbook photo.
"Lou has no plans, but will take life as it comes."
h/t - MotherJones

atane:

Lou Reed’s high school yearbook photo.

"Lou has no plans, but will take life as it comes."

h/t - MotherJones

savetheflower-1967:

Bob Dylan, Joan & Mimi Baez & their mother, 1965.

savetheflower-1967:

Bob Dylan, Joan & Mimi Baez & their mother, 1965.

photomusik:

The Bangles with Leonard Nimoy (1984)

photomusik:

The Bangles with Leonard Nimoy (1984)

(Source: rocknrollicons)

doomandgloomfromthetomb:

bittertwee:

The Feelies - Rock n Roll (VU cover)

from the stellar show at the Sinclair, Cambridge, MA, 9-27-13
The audience is pretty bouncy for Boston! I’m definitely one of the bouncing heads visible in the last 1/3, but I can’t figure out which one.

The right way to end your work week. 

Stills, Young, Crosby & Nash

Stills, Young, Crosby & Nash

(Source: doomandgloomfromthetomb)

explore-blog:

Fascinating and breathtakingly cinematic short film about the nutrient cycle in Alaska, including the Jekyll-and-Hyde life and afterlife of wild salmon, by filmmaker Paul Klaver – the best thing since Radiolab’s poetic piece on the afterlife of whales

Pair with Jon Mooallem’s moving meditation on wildlife

( The Kid Should See This)

lobbycards:

Cul-de-Sac (Blind Alley), US lobby card. 1967

lobbycards:

Cul-de-Sac (Blind Alley), US lobby card. 1967